• Author(s): Andrew Fukuda
is the second book in , written by Andrew Fukuda and published January 2013.

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From author Andrew Fukuda comes the explosive finale to The Hunt trilogy—perfect for fans of !

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  • From author Andrew Fukuda comes the explosive finale to The Hunt trilogy—perfect for fans of !
  • “Andrew Fukuda managed to surprise me. I can't wait to see how it continues in the next book.” —
  • “Andrew Fukuda managed to surprise me. I can't wait to see how it continues in the next book.” —

The Trap (The Hunt Trilogy)

$18.99

I really liked this book. It was so interesting to listen to the story from the point of view of someone who was human - but felt like he didn't fit into the world of the 'people'. The people are never referred to as vampires or monsters, instead it is understood that the people are normal - and the main character is the one who is different. The one who has to adapt in order to fit in.

I was surprised by the very ending of the book - so much that I immediately had to see if there was another book by Andrew Fukuda. I grew to care about the characters in the book and wanted to know what happens to them next!

I absolutely loved where the story went and how Fukuda handled the complicated relationship between Gene, Sissy and Ashley June. I particularly loved how much all these characters grew since the beginning of the series (especially Gene), how mature they've all become. And it's really no wonder, considering all the things they've been put through. In The Trap alone so much happens, they learn so much about the world and themselves, they lose people close to them and have to make decisions that forever change their lives.. I couldn't help but be amazed by how incredibly moving and emotionally affecting this book was. More than once I found myself on the verge of tears with this one.

Reviews

The Hunt | Andrew Fukuda | Macmillan

“Full of suspense and intrigue…the combination of postapocalyptic/dystopian setting and vampires is fresh and gripping. The characters are well developed, and Fukuda captures Gene's struggle to determine his sense of worth and identity after leaving his vampire life behind.” —