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Ethel Payne in Shanghai in 1973. Credit Library of Congress

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When James McGrath Morris set out to write his latest book, he didn’t know how timely it would be. When Eye on the Struggle: Ethel Payne, The First Lady of the Black Press hit shelves, Essence magazine had just released its Black Lives Matter issue. The Justice Department had closed its investigation into Trayvon Martin’s murder with no charges. Mainstream media was scrambling to report on police violence and systemic racial ills and Black Americans took much of this coverage to task for its racist, shallow or negligent portrayals.

When James McGrath Morris set out to write his latest book, he didn’t know how timely it would be. When Eye on the Struggle: Ethel Payne, The First Lady of the Black Press hit shelves, Essence magazine had just released its Black Lives Matter issue. The Justice Department had closed its investigation into Trayvon Martin’s murder with no charges. Mainstream media was scrambling to report on police violence and systemic racial ills and Black Americans took much of this coverage to task for its racist, shallow or negligent portrayals.

Reviews

We have found 52 people in the UK with the name Ethel Payne

In Eye on the Struggle James McGrath Morris lifts Ethel Payne from relative obscurity revealing a fearless, intrepid journalist who covered practically every important event of her day, whether at home in the heat of the civil rights movement or traveling abroad to Africa and Asia.· Payne was as unsparing in her assessments of the comfortable as she was comforting to the afflicted.· She took no