• African American Males and Gifted Education (GE)
  • As previously mentioned, gifted African American males with LDs possess experience ..
  • SEXUALITY, ETHNICITY, AND ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT: THE CHALLENGE FACING GIFTED GAY AFRICAN AMERICAN MALES by JAMES KEVIN CALHOUN (Under the Direction of Robert M. Branch)
  • universities and academically gifted African American males attending traditionally White institutions concerning their relationships

I Am Who I See: The Underachievement of Gifted African American Males

$10.00

The major portion of this book is a detailed report on a qualitative study Bonner conducted for use in his dissertation, The Cultivation of Academic Giftedness in the Historically Black College and University and the Traditional White Institution: Case Studies Involving the Perceptions of Two Academically Gifted African Male Undergraduates, using two African American male colleges undergraduates. (He actually collected data from the two primary subjects and two friends of each of them, along with several teachers and administrators who knew the primary subjects.) In the introduction he adequately defends the use [End Page 635] of data more than 10 years old by describing the lack of change in the conditions and relative numbers of gifted African American male undergraduates. He sets up this study nicely in the first 3 chapters. In chapter 1, he provides a brief history of giftedness in higher education and synopses of the research of pioneers who studied this phenomenon. Chapter 2 establishes the background that accounts for the dearth of gifted African American males identified as gifted in K-12 education as well as postsecondary education. In chapter 3, Bonner describes six factors he has found to be significant to the experiences of gifted African American males in postsecondary education: (a) relationships with faculty, (b) peer relationships, (c) family influence and support, (d) factors influencing college selection, (e) self-perception, and (f) institutional environment. These factors form the framework for his interviews of the subjects in his study.

The major portion of this book is a detailed report on a qualitative study Bonner conducted for use in his dissertation, The Cultivation of Academic Giftedness in the Historically Black College and University and the Traditional White Institution: Case Studies Involving the Perceptions of Two Academically Gifted African Male Undergraduates, using two African American male colleges undergraduates. (He actually collected data from the two primary subjects and two friends of each of them, along with several teachers and administrators who knew the primary subjects.) In the introduction he adequately defends the use [End Page 635] of data more than 10 years old by describing the lack of change in the conditions and relative numbers of gifted African American male undergraduates. He sets up this study nicely in the first 3 chapters. In chapter 1, he provides a brief history of giftedness in higher education and synopses of the research of pioneers who studied this phenomenon. Chapter 2 establishes the background that accounts for the dearth of gifted African American males identified as gifted in K-12 education as well as postsecondary education. In chapter 3, Bonner describes six factors he has found to be significant to the experiences of gifted African American males in postsecondary education: (a) relationships with faculty, (b) peer relationships, (c) family influence and support, (d) factors influencing college selection, (e) self-perception, and (f) institutional environment. These factors form the framework for his interviews of the subjects in his study.

Reviews

Moore III is an associate provost ..

Mentoring does matter especially in the lives of gifted African American males. One thing I have noticed is the difficulty in finding positive role models for those students in a rural setting. So typically their role models are professional athletes who are not within the reach to be a true mentor to a gifted male. How do you find positive mentors for these young men who have so much potential? Grantham writes there are three types of mentoring that can meet the needs of these young people.